I can't believe how tall it is

I can’t believe how tall it is

So, here we are in mid-july.  The flood waters have receded finally but the garden seems to have quadrupled in size from the deluge.  The tomato plant is almost my height, I looked over this morning at it was above my shoulder and at eye level.  For some reason my cucumbers are covered in blooms but I still only have the 2 actual cukes and they are round, I thought they would lengthen as they matured but no, so far still round, hmmmm gotta try and figure that one out.  The squash plants are similar, they have flowered over and over but I don’t see any actual squashes yet but I check every day!  We have 1 ripe tomato finally but the plants are covered with little green tomatoes.  We harvested basil twice now to make our own pesto sauce.  There is nothing like pesto made with freshly cut basil, it’s amazing!  I will be interested to see what the eggplants do, I have never grown them before and the plants are becoming very large and kind of shrubby.  I don’t know how the fruit forms so it will all be new to me!  This has been fun experience after not vegetable gardening for so long, I am already making plans on how I will do things differently next year and what else I will grow.  If anyone has any tips about my cucmbers or eggplants please share!

my cucumbers are round?!

my cucumbers are round?!

The eggplants loved all the rain!

The eggplants loved all the rain!

julygarden julygarden2

peaches almost ready

peaches almost ready

first ripe tomato

first ripe tomato

yellow squash closeup

yellow squash closeup

I just found out some more information about eggplants, apparently now I am waiting for them to produce purple flowers that will change into the fruit. 

this is the flower I am looking for on my plants

this is the flower I am looking for on my plants

  • “Eggplant seeds need to be started indoors about two months before your region’s last frost date. Kept moist and warm, the seed absorbs water and germination occurs. The seed uses its stored energy to produce a small root and two seed leaves. These seed leaves, or cotyledons, provide enough energy until the seedling can grow a set of true leaves.

Seedling to Plant

  • The seedling continues to grow indoors until the weather warms outside. The seedling needs to be kept in a sunny window so it doesn’t get lanky. During this time, the seedling adds height and leaves, and the roots will typically fill the pot. When daytime temperatures average 70 degrees Fahrenheit, the eggplant can be planted outside in a garden area that receives full sun.

  • Flowering
  • Over the next couple months, the eggplant adds more height, fuller leaves and deeper roots. Eventually, small green buds form at the ends of several stems. Within a couple of days, these buds open to reveal the eggplant’s showy purple flower.

Flower to Fruit

  • As bees and other pollinators visit the eggplant flowers, pollen is transferred from one flower to another. When pollination occurs, seeds develop within in the eggplant’s ovary. The ovary itself becomes fleshy and grows into the eggplant that are harvested and eaten.

Fruit to Death

  • Eggplants are annual plants, which means they complete their entire life cycle in one year. Once the eggplant has finished producing fruit, or if no flowers are pollinated, the plant starts to shut down. The leaves stop producing energy for the plant. Within a few weeks, the plant withers and dies.”

Read more: http://www.ehow.com/info_8457682_eggplant-growth-stages.html#ixzz2Yko9Leol

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